Want to Succeed in School? These Tips Will Get You Where You Want to Be

Andrew Weatherman | Power Trip Power Team

Success is relative; the characteristics of successful people differ vastly depending on the situation at hand.

For DECA members attending the “College Success 101” workshop at 2017 Ultimate DECA Power Trip in Philadelphia, Penn., they had the opportunity to learn #Limitless tips and tricks to utilize when navigating college life and finding success at their soon-to-be home.

In attendance were numerous college admissions officers and administrators from Arizona State University, Cornell University, Rochester Institute of Technology and West Virginia University.

At the workshop, members were encouraged to ask questions regarding all facets of college life – from dining options to extracurricular offerings to honors college structure – attending members were exposed to a wide breadth of knowledge from experienced college staff.

Here are my top two takeaways from this insightful workshop:

1. Do What You Love

No matter your school choice, pursue your passions. In higher education, the million-dollar question is not the issue of which residence hall provides the equilibrium distance between the dining hall and the academic buildings, but rather should you opt for following your passions or a degree that would yield a solid career route.

Often pressured by parents and those who “know best,” a majority of students are likely take the latter option.  However, this option was scrupulously rebutted by the panelist in favor of the former.  Told to follow our dreams and do what we love, we learned that students who choose a major that align with their passions are more likely to do better in school compared to their counterparts.

2. Take Chances

Regardless of the officer answering the question, a similar sentiment echoed throughout the workshop: take a chance. The stereotypical picture of regret is simple: an elderly person nostalgically reflecting upon their life, wishing they had taken that one chance, offering to give everything back to change a fateful decision that continues to haunt them. This conventional notion, though, paints a false picture, describing regret as a disease that exclusively attacks the frail. In reality, regret has far less mercy.

A ravaging plague that does not discriminate on age or experience, regret, well, sucks…however, it doesn’t have to.  Through the wise words of the panelists, we were instructed to command our innate self-initiative drive and confidently, thoroughly chase every chance that is presented and create ones where opportunities are not present.

Exiting the workshop armed with new knowledge and the skills needed to succeed in college, the DECA members I interviewed after the workshop delightedly expressed their newfound confidence in navigating the treacherous path of college life.

This article was written by Power Trip Power Team member, Andrew Weatherman. You can follow Andrew on Twitter @Andrew49er1.

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